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Should You Let Your Tenants Have Grills?

Dallas Rental Property_Outdoor GrillingYou might be contemplating whether or not to permit your tenants to use a grill if you own Dallas single-family rental homes. For a number of reasons, such as the serious fire risk they present and the potential for injury, grills should not be permitted on the property. However, these dangers should be weighed against the tenant’s opportunity to enjoy living in the rental property. Tenants who reject your wishes and bring a grill onto the property despite your ban on them are among the issues that may arise as a result of prohibiting grills. It’s crucial to weigh the benefits and drawbacks before deciding whether to permit grills for your tenants.

Grills and smokers are used a lot in American culture. About seven out of ten own one in the U.S. Unfortunately, according to the National Fire Protection Association, grills cause an average of 10,600 home fires per year. Additionally, grill-related injuries send almost 20,000 people to the emergency room each year. Gas or propane grills, the most common type of grill on the market, are to blame for the majority of these fires and injuries. Obviously, the risk of injury or fire is sufficient justification for prohibiting grills on your property.

The potential mess they can create is another disadvantage of allowing grills. Ash is produced by charcoal grills, and all grills can leave greasy messes on a patio or deck. Your tenant may harm the property if they do not know how to remove ashes properly or clean their grill with the proper cleaners. Surfaces with grease are difficult to remove, and ashes left outside in the wind may blow around and coat the house’s exterior surfaces. Each mess is difficult to clean up. In addition, the heat from a grill can cause other types of damage, such as melting vinyl siding or scorching wooden decks or railings. Because it can be difficult to discern whether a tenant will use and clean up after their grill responsibly, you may determine that it is best to prohibit them from having one on the property.

Nevertheless, allowing your tenants to have a grill has some benefits. Probably the greatest advantage of allowing grills is that it will make your tenants happy and facilitate good tenant relations. Given the widespread popularity of grills, allowing your tenant to have one may encourage them to remain in your rental property for a longer period of time.

When Dallas property managers permit tenants to have a grill, it may also help avoid lease violations. It’s unfortunate, but even if you tell your tenant they can’t have a grill, there’s a good chance they’ll still bring one onto the property and try to hide it. Instead, you might think about allowing a grill while taking a few sensible safety measures. Electric grills, for instance, are safer than other grill types and are less likely to start structural fires. This is because aren’t any open flames on electric grills. Allowing your tenant to have an electric grill may not be their first choice, but it may help you keep a good relationship with them while preventing the more serious risks posed by gas or charcoal grills. You might also consider giving them advice on how to maintain and clean their grill. Ultimately, you might discover that reaching a satisfactory agreement regarding the grills is better for you and your tenant in the long run, especially if it means they’ll be more likely to abide by the terms of their lease.

Whether you should allow your tenants to have a grill ultimately depends on your rental property, your preferences, and the circumstances. Regardless of your decision, it’s critical to build a strong bond with your tenant, include precise language in your lease, and respond to requests from your tenant in a timely and professional manner.

Would you like to know more about maintaining a successful Dallas rental property and good tenant relations at the same time? Contact us online today or call us directly at 214-227-2404!

 

Originally published: March 12, 2021

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